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P 160. Medical Physics Seminar. 1(1,0). A general overview of the state-of-the-art of medical technologies in use in hospitals and clinics designed to inspire students to enter the field of medical physics. Professionals in the field will emphasize future career options in Medical Physics. Guest lectures, and visits to hospitals are two of the main activities that will be part of the course.
Prerequisites: None (F)

P 180. Essentials of Medical Physics. 3(3,0). Basic principles in medical physics. Foundation course for theoretical and practical aspects necessary for studying medical physics applications in different areas such as diagnostic imaging, physiological monitoring, and analysis of clinical data.
Prerequisite: P 160/NE, or P 160/B 160 (S), or approval of instructor.

P 203/ENV 203. General Physics III w/Calculus. 3(4,0). A calculus based continuation of P 255. Topics covered include: geometrical and physical optics, relativity, modern and nuclear physics. This course is required for physics majors and is recommended for students majoring in chemistry and all area of engineering technology. Students must concurrently enroll in the companion laboratory course P 223.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of P 254 and P 255, and successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in M 153. (F)

P 223. General Physics III Laboratory. 1(0,2). The laboratory companion course to P 203. The student will have the opportunity to apply concepts presented in the lecture course to a variety of experiments. Techniques of measuring, graphical data analysis, and writing laboratory reports will be practiced.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in P 203. (F)

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P 250. General Physics I w/o Calculus. 3(3,0). A general physics course without calculus covering kinematics, Newtons Laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, energy, and momentum. This course is intended primarily for students majoring in biology. This course, along with P 251, can be used to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of or con-current enrollment in M 152 (Precalculus). (F,S)

P 251. General Physics I Laboratory. 1(0,2). A one-semesterlaboratory course to accompany either P 250 or P 254. The student will apply concepts presented in the lecture course, use diverse methods of data collection and analysis, and learn various ways to report the results of experimentation. This course, along with either P 250 or P 254, can be used to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in either P 250 or P 254. (F,S)

P 252. General Physics II w/o Calculus. 3(3,0). A general physics course without calculus covering topics in fluids thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity, and magnetism. This course is intended primarily for students majoring in biology. This course, along with P 253, can be use to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of P 250. (F,S)

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P 253. General Physics I Laboratory. 1(0,2). A one-semester lab-oratory course to accompany either P 252 or P 255. The student will apply concepts presented in the lecture course, use diverse methods of data collection and analysis, and learn various ways to report the results of experimentation. This course, along with either P 252 or P 255, can be use to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in either P 252 or P 255. (F,S)

P 254. General Physics I w/Calculus. 3(3,0). A general physics course with calculus covering kinematics, Newtons Laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, energy, and momentum. This course is required for students majoring in physics and is recommended for those majoring in chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and civil/mechanical/industrial/or electrical engineering technology. This course, along with P 251, can be used to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in M 153 (Calculus). (F,S)

P 255. General Physics II w/Calculus. 3(3,0). A general physics course with calculus covering topics in fluids, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity, and magnetism. This course is required for students major-ing in physics and is recommended for those majoring in chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and civil/mechanical/ industrial/ or electrical engineering technology. This course, along with P 253, can be used to satisfy one of the two science requirements of the General Education Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of P 254. (F,S)

P 301. Electronics for Scientists. 3(2,2). A general course in electronics intended for students in physics, chemistry, and biology who need to gain a working knowledge of electronic devices and circuits. The course emphasizes various types of electronic circuits and devices. Students construct and analyze electronic circuits and devices.
Prerequisites: P 254 and P 255, Math 163, and consent of instructor. (S,E)

P 302. Optics. 3(3,0). An intermediate course in the study of geometrical and physical optics. Topics studied include on mirrors and lenses, optical instruments, polarization, interference, diffraction, line spectra, thermal radiation, photometry, and color.
Prerequisites: P 254 and P 255, or approval of instructor. (S,O)

P 303. Mechanics I. 3(3,0). Intermediate course includes vector analysis, and application of Newtons laws to three-dimensional motion, oscillations, non-inertial reference frames, and central forces.
Prerequisite: M 163 and consent of department. (F,O)

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P 304. Mechanics II. 3(3,0). Continuation of Physics 303 includes motion of systems of particles, rigid body motion, and Lagrangian mechanics. (S,E)

P 310. Biophysics. 3(3,0). An introductory course in the application of physics to biology. This course is designed to use physics as a tool for understanding biological systems and to understand a living cell from the most basic standpoint possible. Beginning with the sub-atomic level, the basic knowledge of physics is used to understand the structure and function of atoms, simple molecules, macromolecules, cellular organelle, and the many processes occurring within a cell. The ideas of physics, chemistry, and molecular biology are all essential to the course. This course will provide a unified, interdisciplinary view of the sciences.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (S)

P 313/ENV 313. Radioisotope Laboratory. 3(2,2). A course designed to provide a working knowledge of radioisotopes and their technical uses with emphasis on radiation safety, the use of nuclear instrumentation, and tracer problems.
Prerequisite: P 254 and P 255, and consent of instructor. (S,0)

P 322. Introduction to Astrobiology. 3(3,0). Cross-disciplinary introduction with subject matter drawn from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and physics. Questions regarding the conditions necessary for the origin of terrestrial and extraterrestrial life forms as well as the existence of life elsewhere in the universe will be examined.
Prerequisites: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in either P 252 or P 255 and the approval of the department chair. ( )

P 326. Introduction to Astrophysics. 3(3,0). Applications of physics to problems in astrophysics, including planetary astronomy, stellar atmospheres and interiors, the interstellar medium, and galactic dynamics.
Prerequisites: PSC 203, M 163, P 255 or consent of the instructor. ( )

P 338. Scientific Image Analysis. 3(3,0). Introduction to scientific visualization and digital image analysis, including an overview of detectors and imaging techniques used to gather digital images. Software applications will be used to process and analyze images including removal of noise sources and calibration of data. Image display, analysis, and interpretation of digital data will be covered. Applications will be presented from space science, earth science, remote sensing, and the medical fields.
Prerequisites: M 163, P 250 or P 254. ( )

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P 401. Electricity and Magnetism I. 3(3,0). Intermediate course includes vector calculus, electrostatics, solution of Laplaces equation, dielectrics, and magnetostatics.
Prerequisites: P 254 and P 255, M 163. (F,E)

P 402. Electricity and Magnetism II. 3(3,0). Continuation of P 401 includes magnetic materials, electrodynamics, and electromagnetic waves. (S,O)

P 403. Thermodynamics. 3(3,0). A study of the fundamental concepts of classical thermodynamics and their applications to gases, kinetic theory, vapors and mixtures, heat transfer, and energy transformation.
Prerequisite: M 163 and consent of department. (F,O)

P 406. Introduction to Modern Physics. 3(3,0). A study of the experimental and theoretical advances in physics during the twentieth century. Among the topics discussed are the wave theory of matter, the theory of relativity, atomic structure, and the quantum mechanical theory of the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisite: Consent of the department. (F,E)

P 407. Advanced Laboratory. 1 to 3 (1,4). Selected experiments in physics of an advanced nature.
Prerequisites: P 301 and M 163 or consent of department. (S,0)

P410. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. 3(3,0). This course will present principles of quantum mechanics. Physical content and mathematical formulation of the theory will be studied. Problems in one-dimensional motion with wave and matrix mechanics will also be presented.
Prerequisites: P 254 and P 255, and Physics 406. ( )

P 498-499. Special Topic in Physics. 1-3(1-3,1.3). These courses will provide the student and opportunity for detailed study of specialized fields in physics such as astrophysics, medical physics and high temperature superconductivity. Students may also use these courses to pursue independent research projects. Topics offered will be based on requests by students or at the discretion of the faculty. Independent research projects must have faculty approval. A student may repeat this course with different topics or research for up to a maximum of six (6) credit hours.
Prerequisites: Depends on the topic offered or the area of research pursued. ( )

ETS 468-469. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar in Space Science. 1 (1,0) A two-semester course which provides the opportunity for students to attain first-hand research experience working as a member of an interdisciplinary student research team under the direction of a faculty mentor. Research projects related to space science will be chosen so as to utilize the training and skills of each team member. Presentation of results at a state, regional or national professional meeting will be a requirement of the course. Grading of the course will be on a pass/fail basis.
Prerequisite: Permission of the appropriate Department Chairperson and the Instructor, (F,S)

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Physical Science

PSC 150. Foundations of Physical Science. 3(3,0). A one-semester course for non-science majors. The primary purpose of the course is to enhance the scientific literacy of those students who do not have a strong background in mathematics or special aptitude in science. Basic concepts in physics such as motion, heat and temperature, wave motion, electricity, and magnetism are studied. The historical development of these concepts and the methods of scientific inquiry are examined.
NOTE: Those students whose curricula require a laboratory science should concurrently enroll in PSC 151. (F,S)

PSC 151. Physical Science Laboratory. 1(0,2). A one-semester laboratory course to accompany PSC 150. The student will have the opportunity to apply concepts presented in the lecture course to a variety of experiments. Techniques such as accurate measuring and graphical data analysis will be practiced.
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in PSC 150. (F,S)

PSC 152. Foundations of Earth/Space Science. 3(3,0). A one-semester course for non-science majors. It is designed to enhance the scientific literacy of those students who do not have a strong back-ground in mathematics or special aptitude in science. Basic concepts in astronomy, atmospheric science, geology, and oceanography are examined. Theories on the origin and evolution of the Earth, Solar System, and Universe are discussed along with their historical development. Current problems such as pollution, hazardous waste disposal, and depletion of natural resources are presented and possible solutions debated.
NOTE: Those students whose curricula require a laboratory science should concurrently enroll in PSC 153. (F,S)

PSC 153. Earth/Space Science Laboratory. 1(0,2). A one-semester laboratory course to accompany PSC 152 or PSC 203. The student will apply concepts presented in the lecture course to a variety of hands-on learning activities such as map reading, telescope observations, weather predicting, and rock identification.
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in PSC 152. (F,S)

PSC 154 Modern Ideas in Physical Science: Cosmology for Non-Science Majors, 3(3,0). This course gives students an opportunity to study basic physics with an emphasis on more recent scientific discoveries in physics. Scientific evidence will be studied qualitatively, using graphs, computer simulations, and Hands-on activities. This course complements the survey courses in the physical science cluster which do not have the time to address topics in depth.
Prerequisite: M 152: Pre-Calculus, or equivalent.

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PSC 200. Elementary Geology. 3(3,0). A study of the earth as a planet, the rocks and minerals of which it is composed and the processes that continually modify its surface. (F)

PSC 202. Physical Geology. 3(2,2). An interdisciplinary approach to physical geology, emphasizing the nature and origin of minerals and rocks; volcanoes; earthquakes; interiors of the earth; mountains; soil; subsurface water; coastal features; landscape; and the geologic work of glaciers, streams, and wind; with special attention given to the geological processes in ecology and the geological hazards in pollution. ( )

PSC 203. Elementary Astronomy. 3(2,2). A conceptual, descrip-tive, guided exploration of the cosmos within which we live. This course should appeal to everyone with an interest in astronomy and especially to those planning to teach science on the junior high or high school levels. Students need no training in mathematics but may find knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry helpful. Areas of focus include: the history, foundations, and tools of astronomy; the solar system; the nature, variety, and formation of stars; galaxies, cosmic origins, and the search for life in the cosmos.